The Birdcage



In this contemporary American adaptation of the 1978 outrageous French farce LA CAGE AUX FOLLES, the story centers on the life of a middle-aged, flamboyant gay couple…Armand and Albert…in the eclectic community of South Beach, Florida, who have raised a straight son. The son announces his engagement to the daughter of a right-wing U.S. senator, and wants to bring his fiancee and her ultraconservative parent’s home to meet his family for the first time. What choice is there but to accept his decision with love? So Armand and Albert must pretend to be very straight by attempting to play out the roles of your typical heterosexual “husband” and “wife”. Of course, as they dig themselves deeper into the deception, the funnier the situations!

Erik the Viking



Ever since he accidentally killed a girl he was just getting to like, Erik (Tim Robbins) has been moody. Fed up with the emptiness of life in the Dark Ages, he leads a quest to wake the gods and bring back the sun… and the girl, if she’ll have him. But along the way, Erik will have to face formidable obstacles, including a dragon with hay fever, tone-deaf islanders who love to sing, and a warlord (John Cleese) who likes his Ages dark and nasty!

Wargames



A 80’s teenager, bored by traditional high school subjects like biology but fascinated by computers, accidentally taps into the Pentagon’s top-secret computer…the USA’s NORAD system. He starts what he innocently believes is a computer game called “Global Thermonuclear War,” but the “game” is real. The Pentagon’s best minds cannot shut down or reprogram the supercomputer that is readying a missile attack against the USSR, and thereby unleash Armageddon. The teen and his girlfriend attempt to aid the helpless Pentagon and, in a frantic race against a ticking “doomsday clock,” try to persuade the computer to end the “game.”

Child's Play



When serial killer Charles Lee Ray is mortally wounded in a police shoot-out, he uses a voodoo spell to transfer his soul into Chucky, a “Good Guys” doll. Young Andy receives the doll as a birthday gift, and Chucky soon resumes his killing spree. However, Charles doesn’t want to be trapped in the body of a doll forever. His only escape would be to transfer into the first human he revealed his true identity to… which places Andy in mortal danger.

Be Cool



Be Cool is the wildly hilarious tale about a gangster turned music mogul… and what it takes to be number one with a bullet. When Chili Palmer decides to try his hand in the music industry, he romances the sultry widow of a recently whacked music exec, poaches a hot young singer from a rival label and discovers that the record industry is packin’ a whole lot more than a tune!

Little Secrets



Emily Lindstrom, a gifted 14-year-old violinist, skips summer camp in order to prepare for an audition with the prestigious San Francisco Youth Orchestra. Emily has also set up a side business as a “secret keeper”, charging a 50-cent fee to share and keep the neighborhood children’s secrets. She soon discovers, however, that there is a price to keeping secrets that can’t be measured in coins.

Big Men



Executive produced by Brad Pitt, Big Men follows what happens when a Texas oil firm makes an enormous discovery off West Africa’s coast. Gaining unprecedented access to reveal big business in oil, it took six years to make and takes viewers around the world, from inside Wall Street boardrooms to the jungle camp of a Nigerian militant group. Director Rachel Boynton has an incredible ability to go behind closed doors; her access is critical when Kosmos Energy makes its enormous discovery. Christened the Jubilee Field, this massive undersea deposit had the potential to return a staggering $2.2 billion to investors. Big Men is a story told from the inside, as it happens, not reconstructed once the dust settles. Called “a real-life Chinatown or There Will Be Blood” by Variety critic Scott Foundas, this extraordinary film poses fundamental questions about what motivates us all: Is unbridled greed an intrinsic part of human nature? And can what unites us ever be greater than what divides us?